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Yoga lowers number of compounds in blood and reduces inflammation

December 14, 2015

"Part of the problem with sorting out exactly what makes yoga effective in reducing stress is that if you try to break it down into its components, like the movements or the breathing, it's hard to say what particular thing is causing the effect," said Christian, herself a yoga instructor. "That research simply hasn't been done yet."

Ron Glaser, a co-author and a professor of molecular virology, immunology and medical genetics, said that the study has some fairly clear implications for health.

"We know that inflammation plays a major role in many diseases. Yoga appears to be a simple and enjoyable way to add an intervention that might reduce risks for developing heart disease, diabetes and other age-related diseases" he said.

"This is an easy thing people can do to help reduce their risks of illness."

Bill Malarkey, an professor of internal medicine and co-author on the study, pointed to the inflexibility that routinely comes with aging.

"Muscles shorten and tighten over time, mainly because of inactivity," he said. "The stretching and exercise that comes with yoga actually increases a person's flexibility and that, in turn, allows relaxation which can lower stress."

Malarkey sees the people's adoption of yoga or other regular exercise as one of the key solutions to our current health care crisis. "People need to be educated about this. They need to be taking responsibility for their health and how they live. Doing yoga and similar activities can make a difference."

As a clinician, he says, "Much of my time is being spent simply trying to get people to slow down."

The researchers' next step is a clinical trial to see if yoga can improve the health and reduce inflammation that has been linked to debilitating fatigue among breast cancer survivors. They're seeking 200 women to volunteer for the study that's funded by the National Cancer Institute.

Source: Ohio State University