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NIH awards CCTSI $2.2 million grant to advance personalized medicine

March 25, 2016

The device coming to Colorado will provide the sequence of a human genome for $10,000 (a 300,000-fold reduction in cost from that first genome sequence), in about a week (about a 500-fold reduction in time) through the effort of as few as three people. And the cost is expected to come down rapidly while efficiency goes up.

"This instrument brings personalized medicine to the threshold of our clinics," says Mark Johnston, PhD, chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics. "It is likely that, because of DNA sequencers such as the one we're bringing to Colorado, reading a patient's personal DNA code will be a routine part of the clinical workup within the next five years."

The medical school implemented the first generation of this technology in February 2009, and has provided DNA sequence data to more than 30 investigators at the University of Colorado on the Anschutz Medical Campus and the Boulder Campus.

"In the big picture, this grant furthers our ability to accelerate the pace with which we can bring new discoveries to improve the health and lives of people in Colorado," said Ronald J. Sokol, MD, director and principal investigator of the CCTSI."As an organization focused on putting science to work for patients, we are not only a medical school resource but also a Colorado resource."

Source: University of Colorado Denver