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New clinical trial to prevent aggressive type of breast cancer

April 05, 2016

The researchers concentrated on 'hard to heal' ulcers that had not cleared up after six months or longer. Drawing on patients from across the UK and Ireland, they found that adding ultrasound to the standard approach to care - dressings and compression therapy - made no difference to the speed of healing or the chance of the ulcers coming back. Ultrasound also raised the cost of care per patient by almost -200.

"Rising levels of obesity mean that the number of people who suffer from legs ulcers is likely to grow," Professor Nelson said. "We do need to find ways to helping those patients who ulcers won't go away, but our study shows that ultrasound is not the way to do that. We need to focus on what really matters, which is good quality nursing care. There really is no need for the NHS to provide district nurses with ultrasound machines. This would not be money well spent."

The study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment Programme (HTA).

Full details of the findings are published online today in advance of publication in the British Medical Journal and Health Technology Assessment.

Source: University of Leeds